Definite Article – Amouage Beloved Man Perfume Review

A Definite Article

A Definite Article

There are a small number of perfume houses that I would consider to have me completely hooked. By this I mean that I adore most of their output so far and will always pay attention to anything new they release. Houses such as this – Thierry Mugler, Maison Francis Kurkdjian and Etat Libre d’Orange to name a few – always have a clear vision as to what makes a perfume one of theirs.

Amouage is one such house where each and every offering is a definite article that incorporates the strong ‘east meets west’ aesthetic that the brand was founded upon. With each year a new chapter in the Amouage story is unleashed and Creative Director Christopher Chong constantly pushes the boundaries of niche perfumery.

Last year Amouage launched a super-exclusive (and equally super-exclusively priced) rose perfume called Beloved. It seems that this year the house deemed it fit for it to be joined by a masculine counterpart. Beloved Man was created by perfumer Bernard Ellena and is a woody oriental that serves as “a nod to the 1980 movie Somewhere in Time.”

Beloved Man

Beloved Man

The Notes

Orange, Grapefruit, Elemi, Geranium, Jasmine, Iris, Saffron, Cedarwood, Lignum Vitae, Leather, Patchouli, Vetiver and Musk

How Does it Smell?

To my nose the main body of Beloved Man seems to be contrast of a core of wood spice and an unusual soapy vetiver accord. An ensemble cast of assorted personas – iris (in a lilac coloured tone), cardamom and saffron – accent these two main players to give a more solid and full effect.

The base is decidedly more velvety with emphasis on leather and vanilla notes. There isn’t a great deal of sweetness rather a dry, plush feel that is pleasantly soft, almost too obviously so. There’s the faintest whiff of smoke lurking in the background to add depth in the final stages.

Beloved Man strikes me as a rather handsome easy-going masculine with an elegant edge. As with all things Amouage it is exceptionally well made, the quality and proportions of the ingredients are the usual gold standard, but when compared to such inventive compositions as 2012’s Interlude Man Beloved Man feels just a little bit too straight laced and lacking in the signature drama that Amouage is famous for.

A very well made and self-assured masculine that is lacking in wow factor for the price isn’t enough to get me breaking down the doors of the nearest Amouage boutique but Beloved Man is a worthy masculine, albeit a more traditional and understated one.

Availability

Beloved Man is available in 100ml Eau de Parfum for $425 at Amouage boutiques and select department stores.

Disclaimer
PR Sample. Image 1 via cafleurebon.com. Image 2 via perfumeposse.com. Notes and quotes via nstperfume.com.

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12 thoughts on “Definite Article – Amouage Beloved Man Perfume Review

  1. I reckon they need to just ditch the whole ‘masculine’ thing for the next one and go for something really radical. If you lined up all the Amouage men’s fragrances they would all be very good, but it would be like inspecting the lineup of some Arab military (something I would gladly do but that is by the by…)

    There is something so boring and conservative about never straying beyond the borders of what is acceptable to men. How about a real flamboyant rose, or, dare I say it, tuberose?

    • I see your point, the good thing with Amouage though is if you’re looking for florals and flamboyance you simply need to look in the direction of the women’s line. Plenty of fun to be found there!

      Still, I agree that the masculines, Interlude aside, tend to be more straight-laced than the feminines and Beloved is perhaps the worst offender.

  2. Dear CPB
    I’ve always thought that with Amouge, perhaps more than any other house, the labels ‘man’ and ‘woman’ on the perfumes were almost wholly redundant.
    The tradition that is being drawn on doesn’t really recognise the same distinctions – rose for example being ‘masculine’, woods being for either gender – and indeed harks back to the classical notion that perfumes were ungendered.
    Travel to a traditional perfume seller in the Levant, Maghreb or, I’m told, the Gulf and they would have few preconceived notions as to what you should wear according solely to your sex.
    All that said, this does seem – from the review and the notes – to be a more traditionally ‘male’ fragrance and one more in the Western mode – I wonder if that’s why it doesn’t excited me on paper at least.
    Yours ever
    The Perfumed Dandy

  3. I was thrilled to win a large sample at the Posse, and my (kind of) conservative husband adores it. But that price tag… the guy will never get a FB of this, what a shame!

  4. Thank you for your review.
    I tested this fragrance on my skin. My skin seems to love it.
    The longevity is oustanding (as long as Interlude Man) and the sillage is greater than Tobacco Vanille, M, AplS etc.

    I have a deep relationship to cederwood notes.

    It only smells (ceder)woody on my skin like Straight to Heaven. There is still no difference between of them on my skin.

    How do you compare Beloved for Men to Beloved for Women?

    Are there other Amouage fragrances (no matter if for women or for men), that strongly smell (ceder)woody such as Beloved for Men?

    Otherwise, I seriously think if I should purchase Beloved for Men (The price is so steeeeeeep…..).

    • Honour Man is quite woody and peppery, perhaps the closest Amouage you’d find with a cedar feel. Epic Man is also very woody and wonderful but more oud=like than cedar-filled.

      It sounds like you’ve fallen for Beloved Man completely! I prefer Beloved Woman which is a gorgeous, luminescent rose.

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