Cock-a-Doodle-Doo – Jean Paul Gaultier Kokorico Perfume Review

Kokorico

I’m not entirely sure why, but ever since the news of Kokorico started hitting the Blogosphere I have been absolutely desperate to try it. Perhaps it’s the fact that Jean Paul Gaultier, despite being somewhat over-exposed, is a solid line of well-made fragrances or, perhaps it’s the fact that I’m a sucker for a quirky bottle, and Kokorico’s bottle is definitely full of quirk. Whatever the reason, I was very glad when esteemed perfume blogger Persolaise gifted me a sample of Kokorico to try.

Kokorico (isn’t the name fun to say?!) is the latest masculine release by Jean Paul Gaultier and it has big shoes to fill. Following in the footsteps of such a colossal bestseller as Gaultier’s Le Mâle is no mean feat, and after the discontinuation of Gaultier’s second masculine release Fleur du Mâle, the pressure is on for the brand to have a success.

This latest addition to the Jean Paul Gaultier line is composed by the olfactory dream team of Annick Menardo (Lolita Lempicka, Hypnotic Poison and Bvlgari Black) and Olivier Cresp (Angel, Kenzo Amour and Juniper Sling)  and is described as “a powerful and explosive aphrodisiac, emphasising woody and cocoa notes” [2] and the name ‘Kokorico’ comes from the french name for the rooster’s cry, their version of ‘Cock-a-Doodle-Doo’. Everything about the marketing of this fragrance; the bright red ‘graffiti’, the pushed up feathers and the confident strutting of Jon Kortajarena in the tv/print ad screams cockiness and masculine confidence, I’m just not entirely sure the fragrance is on board with the idea.

Jon Kortajarena strutting his stuff in the Jean-Baptiste Mondino directed TV spot for Kokorico.

The Notes

Top: Fig Leaf
Heart: Patchouli and Cedar
Base: Cocoa and Vetiver [1]

How Does it Smell? 

Kokorico starts relatively green, with a sweet and spiky fig leaf note, there is also a pleasant figgy milkiness that acts as an undercurrent that runs throughout the fragrance. The most noticeable part of Kokorico is the cocoa, and surprisingly the cocoa doesn’t turn Kokorico into a gourmand, there is enough dry wood to balance the cocoa and give the impression of warm, slightly bitter woods.

There is also a pleasant anisic vibe to Kokorico, and that is no surprise seeing as it is half-composed by the ‘Queen of Anise’ Annick Menardo, and unlike other Menardo fragrances the anise is used sparingly, and Kokorico is all the better for it.

As Kokorico develops, the patchouli and vetiver become more pronounced and they work nicely with the cocoa to create a smell that is not only masculine, but also cosy and comfortable. My only real problem with Kokorico lies with the quality of the woody notes which, despite starting out relatively dry and warm, become stronger, more obtrusive and ‘synthetic smelling’ within the base.

The base is a pleasing blend of cocoa, patchouli, a flash of vetiver and quite a large amount of vanilla. It is just a shame that the woods try to take over at this point, and their synthetic hue can’t seem to help but ruins things slightly.

It is impossible to smell Kokorico and not draw parallels with two other, rather excellent masculines; Guerlain’s L’Instant de Guerlain and Thierry Mugler’s (sadly discontinued) B*Men. The fragrance is certainly derivative, and whilst it may seem like a mishmash of the two aforementioned masculines, it seems less spicy than B*Men and not as rich as L’Instant. Despite it’s derivative nature, Kokorico does have it’s own identity and I certainly wouldn’t shun it because of the similarities.

Kokorico doesn’t quite live up to my expectations, I did have really high hopes for it and perhaps I have hyped it up in my mind a little bit too much, and I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a little bit disappointed but, and this is a big but, it is a heck of a lot better than most of the masculine dreck that is released and I’m struggling to think of a better designer masculine released this year. I am tempted to purchase a bottle when it becomes available over here, I imagine that it’s going to work really well in the colder months, but only time will tell if I do decide to bite the bullet.

The BottleKokorico Flacon

Having packaged his scents in a variety of unusual flacons, including; male and female torsos, a snow globe and dual magnetic bottles, Monsieur Gaultier doesn’t scrimp on the creativity with Kokorico.

Kokorico is packaged within a jet black head adorned with bright red feather-styled graffiti, yet the most striking feature of the bottle is the fact that it highlights the silhouette of the Le Mâle/Fleur du Mâle torso when it is turned on its side, which just highlights the importance of Gaultier’s first masculine. The flacon is also housed in a bright red tin in the shape of a film canister.

For other reviews on Kokorico please see Persolaise, Memory of Scent and Now Smell This.

Availability

Kokorico is available in 50ml or 100ml Eau de Toilette, prices range from £36.50-£54.00. A set of matching body products (shower gel, deodorant and after shave lotion) are also available.

Disclaimer

This review is based on a sample of Kokorico kindly gifted to me by Persolaise.

[1] osmoz.com

[2] fragrantica.com

Image 1 malemodelscene.net

Image 2 olfactorum.blogspot.com

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