Cire Trudon Les Belles Matières: Maduraï Scented Candle

Maduraï by Cire Trudon
Maduraï by Cire Trudon

Cire Trudon is not a conventional house of home fragrance. They do not, like many brands, create candles that represent one smell, like rose or oud, or even combinations of such notes. No, Cire Trudon tell stories through wax, smoke and glass. They are a brand that allow you to fill your home with the scent of the cold stone walls from a Carmelite convent or fresh mint from the mountains of ancient tribes. Cire Trudon are not a typical brand and their many scented offerings are anything but ordinary, in fact they are rather extraordinary!

This Spring, Cire Trudon have twisted their narrative ever so slightly with their Les Belles Matières collection. Starting with three scented candles, which are housed in the most eye-catching of blue jars, Cire Trudon promise a “geographic odyssey” with this new collection, which takes one on a journey to three exotic destinations by way of iconic ingredients, covering not only a number of air miles but also three of the most familiar olfactory genres: florals, woods and fruits. The three scents are Tadine (New-Caledonia by way of sandalwood), Reggio (Calabria via citrus) and Maduraï, the focus of today’s review, which is all about “the splendour of Indian Jasmine”.

I’ve never been to India but you don’t have to do much convincing to get me on board with a white floral so the prospect of an jasmine sambac by the bucket load is an easy sell. Maduraï tells the tale of the flower’s many uses, whether they be in tea, as floral garlands or in perfumery. Maduraï is an ode to jasmine in its full glory and unexpectedly, it’s rather glorious.

Cire Trudon Does Jasmine
Cire Trudon Does Jasmine

The Notes

Top: Ylang-Ylang
Heart: Sambac Absolute
Base: Benzoin


How Does it Smell?

Like jasmine, unsurprisingly, but where so many candles present the screechy side of jasmine, the note’s bubblegum sweetness, or even its dirty indolic nature, Maduraï showcases a soft, wispy jasmine full of warmth. Everything is measured here; there’s a touch of sweetness, some greenery and even a dash of that hot breathiness that makes jasmine so dirty. It feels tropical and glows with a radiant warmth, speaking of exotic places rather than classic perfumes. What’s more, there’s a sumptuous benzoin base that gives a gauzy/fluffy texture that adds a much needed weigh to those beautiful wisps of delightful jasmine. It smells as lovely as that blue glass looks, let’s put it that way.

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Maduraï Burning

The burn time and quality of burn is top notch, as is always the case with Cire Trudon. Some candles have a tendency to burn black, staining the glass and sending off unattractive plumes of dark smoke up into the air but Cire Trudon have always managed to produce a clean burn, filled with scent. The Maduraï candle isn’t quite as present as others I’ve had from the brand (Solis Rex for example, has a house-filling throw, but then again it’s inspired by Versailles, which is somewhat bigger than your average dwelling so that makes sense), but that’s actually a good thing. Maduraï produces a soft, billowy air of gauzy jasmine that manages to be present without overbearing. It’s the kind of scent you’ll notice every now and then, and it will make you smile.

Just like all Cire Trudon products, the Maduraï candle is exquisite in every way. That blue glass? Beautiful. That golden label? Resplendent. The fragrance? Out of this world. All together you have a scented candle that transports you to an entirely different place, one where the scent of jasmine permeates the warm air with its heady floral tones. It’s just like visiting India without the expensive air fare or the requirement to leave your house. All you need is a Maduraï candle, a match and your imagination, and you too can be transported to the far corners of the globe.


Availability

The three candles in Cire Trudon’s Les Belles Matières Collection (Maduraï, Reggio and Tadine) are available for £78/270g.


Disclaimer

Sample, notes and quotes via Cire Trudon. Images are my own.

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