MUGLER COLOGNE COLLECTION

IMG_6396

To me, MUGLER COLOGNE, has always felt like a perfect mid-point in the MUGLER brand. Where ANGEL and ALIEN etc. have always been divisive, challenging compositions, COLOGNE embodies a more palatable signature, whilst maintaining the innovative, unusual quality of the brand. With its weird, steamy muskiness, COLOGNE is as much a ‘MUGLER’ as ANGEL, but somehow it feels more casual, more effortless and with a wider appeal.

IMG_6375

For the first time since the launch of MUGLER COLOGNE in 2001, MUGLER have expanded the COLOGNE franchise, adding four (four!!) new MUGLER COLOGNES for us to enjoy. The original stays within the collection but has a new name (‘COME TOGETHER’) to fit alongside its colourful, free-spirited progeny. With this collection, MUGLER wants us to have fun – to “mix, create and play” with our fragrance and to enjoy “endless possibilities”.

IMG_6398

TAKE ME OUT


The Notes

Orange Blossom, Shiso Leaf, Secret “P” Note


How Does it Smell?

OK, OK, no chuckling at the “P” note, please. Thankfully MUGLER used this note in the orange bottle not the yellow…. Anyway, TAKE ME OUT (Jean-Christophe Hérault) is the warmest and least cologne-like of the bunch. It’s essentially a blend of sticky orange blossom and vanilla, with a plush, gourmand vibe. The shiso leaf adds a touch of levity and greenery, but the overall feel is of a warm white floral with a cashmere-like texture, almost as if the traditional neroli note of an eau de cologne had been cooked under the sun. TAKE ME OUT is delicious, solar and addictive.

IMG_6401

FLY AWAY


The Notes

Yellow Grapefruit, Hemp Accord and Secret “C” Note


How Does it Smell?

I’ll come right out and say that FLY AWAY (Nathalie Cetto) is easily my favourite. It boasts a wonderfully bitter and acerbic grapefruit accord that is bolstered by lots of other juicy fruit notes such as mandarin. Underneath that big punch of vibrant citrus is an odd herbal note (the hemp accord) that amplifies the overall biting feel to the fragrance. To me, FLY AWAY feels like a really modern take on a classic, aromatic masculine fragrance where both the herbs and citrus have been pushed to extremes. FLY AWAY is rugged, energetic and unusual.

IMG_6397

COME TOGETHER


The Notes

Green Petitgrain, White Musk and Secret “S” Note


How Does it Smell?

COME TOGETHER (Alberto Morillas) is the new name for the original MUGLER COLOGNE – ‘the O.G.’ – and if you are familiar with this classic MUGLER, then not much has changed. It is still the same grassy green cologne awash with cottony petitgrain and lots of white musks that give it that steam ‘fresh out of the shower’ vibe. It does feel like it has lost something – a fullness that provided a soapy texture. Other than that, COME TOGETHER is MUGLER COLOGNE – a worthy centrepiece to this collection.

Fun fact: the famed ‘S’ note in COME TOGETHER is reportedly a semen accord, named simply as ‘S’ because back in 2001, a mainstream fragrance with an accord would have been far too risqué. The idea of having this ‘S’ accord was to inject something dirty into a fragrance that was otherwise sterile and clean. The more you know, eh?

IMG_6383

LOVE YOU ALL


The Notes

White Amber, Blue Liquorice Accord and Secret “E” Note


How Does it Smell?

The blue juice that is LOVE YOU ALL (ugh, these names) (Jean-Christophe Hérault) would lead one to think this is the aquatic one of the bunch, but it really isn’t. This is another aromatic and I find it to be the most abstract. It speaks in citrus, herbs, flowers, and musks, but it’s hard to pinpoint anything specific, presenting an olfactory signature that is more than the sum of these parts. That may make it sound like I’m not a fan, but in all honesty, I think this is one of the strongest in the collection and if I were to describe the smell of LOVE YOU ALL (which I should do, seeing as this is a perfume blog…) I would say that it smells like a cloudy sky filled with rain. LOVE YOU ALL is amorphous, perplexing and intriguing.

IMG_6410

RUN FREE


The Notes

Purple Ginger, Akigalawood and Secret “D” Note


How Does it Smell?

Before I had even smelled RUN FREE (Shyamala Maisondieu) I wanted to love it. You see, I don’t have a favourite colour, but if I did, I think it would be purple and the purple in this bottle is a very good one. But what about the scent? Well, RUN FREE is the one I can’t quite get my head around. It’s green, earthy and mineral, with a clean, fresh quality up top that sparkles without the juicy bite of citrus. It just feels, well, a bit grey and dowdy. I was expecting a euphoric, rushing blast of purple and got, well, the opposite of that. RUN FREE is refreshing, cold and grey.

IMG_6372


The Verdict

These are all very nice, easy colognes that embody the spirit of the original, which is to say they are intriguing, affable twists on the traditional eau de cologne. It feels almost as each one is a spin-off from the original, making for a cohesive line-up that feels as playful and as fun as MUGLER promise them to be. For me, they pass the most important test: they smell good.

Whilst I enjoy the fragrances, I’ll be brutally honest and say that I don’t like the names – they seem silly (a bit twee, let’s face it) and I wish that MUGLER had just used the colours in the names. Speaking of the colours, I think it is fair to say they don’t really align with the scents – smelling RUN FREE I imagine the colour grey rather than purple and LOVE YOU ALL makes me think of white rather than blue… but that’s a small complaint.

Anyway dodgy names and discordant colour ways aside, I think this is a solid collection of colognes that stays true to the formula and format that made MUGLER COLOGNE such an icon. I think I’m going to wear my favourite, FLY AWAY, quite a lot and I can’t wait to see how they fair in the summer. Also – I’m a need them to add a red one, a pink one, ooh and perhaps a clear one (plot twist) too. All in all, colour me impressed!


Availability

All five MUGLER Colognes are £55/100ml.


Disclaimer

Samples (pictured) sent by MUGLER for consideration. I was not paid for this review and MUGLER had no input in the contents of this article. Notes and quotes via MUGLER. Images are my own.